Jack Charlton - WC66 - RIP

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:(
RIP Jack Charlton
 

Paul USA

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Jack and Bobby,s cousin lives 2 doors down from me - he got a Shirt signed by both for me as needed for a charity auction.

RIP Jack, a player from the good old days
 

filmyfan

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One of the great images of the 66 final - is JC slumped on his knees at the final whistle with his head in his hands. RIP
 

West Wilts Bee

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RIP Jackie Charlton.an English legend, 95 goals from a centre half wow. He like is Brother Bobby are the greats of our game.Very sad day for all footballing fans and our country.
 

West Wilts Bee

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How many are still alive from the 1966 team ? Bobby C, Banks, Hurst, Peters, Cohen, Hunt, Stiles, Greaves....?
Take Banks, Peters, and Cohen of your list.
 

West Wilts Bee

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Sorry put Cohen back on list.
 

wanderer paul

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Those in BOLD still with us. Those in ITALICS sadly passed.

Just ten of the twenty-two alive, with just five of the XI loving life!

https://www.standard.co.uk/sport/fo...ld-cup-winners-now-west-germany-a4495456.html

1 Gordon Banks | 1937 - 2019

Went on to win 73 England caps and make 628 club appearances in a 15-year career. Still famed for his stunning save from Pele's header in England's 1970 World Cup clash with Brazil. Helped Stoke to the 1972 League Cup though lost the sight in one eye in a car crash in October later that same year, that ultimately ended his professional career. Enjoyed a brief managerial stint with Telford United.

2 George Cohen | 1939 - present

Fulham defender Cohen was forced to retire through injury aged 29, having amassed 459 appearances for the Craven Cottage club. Cohen struggled with bowel cancer for 14 years in the 1980s. He later opted to sell his World Cup winner's medal, though Fulham purchased the item to display it at Craven Cottage. Nephew Ben Cohen helped England win the Rugby World Cup in 2003. Awarded the MBE in 2000.

3 Ray Wilson | 1934 - 2018

England's left-back kept the lowest profile of the 1966 winners. Wilson built a successful undertaker's business in Huddersfield after his football career, but retired from his second career in 1997.

4 Nobby Stiles | 1942 - present

Midfielder Stiles ended up with 28 England caps but went on to rack up 392 appearances for Manchester United before a move to Middlesbrough in 1971. A career in coaching followed, with two stints at Preston, before a short-lived tenure at West Brom. Stiles worked as a youth team coach at Manchester United between 1989 and 1993, helping oversee the development of the renowned class of '92 that included the likes of David Beckham and the Neville brothers. His family have revealed he has been suffering from dementia for several years.

5 Jack Charlton | 1935 - 2020

Made 629 appearances for Leeds and collected 35 England caps, before turning attention to a successful managerial career. After stints with Middlesbrough, Sheffield Wednesday and Newcastle, Charlton stepped up to lead the Republic of Ireland. Against the odds, he led them to the Euros in 1988, the last eight of Italia 90 and then last 16 of the 1994 World. Appointed an OBE in 1974 and awarded honorary Irish citizenship in 1996, being made a freeman of the city of Dublin in 1994. He died in July 2020 after battling lymphoma and later dementia.

6 Bobby Moore | 1941 - 1993

Widely accepted as England's greatest centre-half and one of the best anywhere of all time, the World Cup-winning captain died from bowel and liver cancer in February 1993, aged 51. Won 108 caps for England, representing West Ham with distinction, before enjoying spells at Fulham and in America. Moore's widow Stephanie founded the Bobby Moore Fund in 1993, to raise money for research into bowel cancer and raise public awareness of the disease. His statue stands outside the new Wembley to commemorate England's greatest ever day.

7 Alan Ball | 1945 - 2007

Ball - the youngest of the World Cup winners - died of a heart attack in April 2007, aged 61. The combative midfielder excelled in stints with Blackpool, Everton and Arsenal, while also winning 72 England caps. After more than 800 club appearances Ball then moved into management, twice taking charge at Portsmouth along with stints at Southampton and Manchester City.

9 Sir Bobby Charlton | 1937 - present

Jack's younger brother Bobby continues to sit on Manchester United's board of directors, remaining a fixture at Old Trafford matches, and is a true global icon. The 81-year-old Ashington native racked up 106 England caps between 1958 and 1970 and was for decades England's leading goalscorer. He had an unsuccessful managerial stint at Preston before becoming a director at United in 1984. He was knighted in 1994.

16 Martin Peters | 1943 - 2019

Moved into the insurance business after retiring from professional football in 1981, following 67 England caps and lengthy stints with West Ham, Tottenham and Norwich. He was briefly manager of Sheffield United. Sat on Tottenham's board of directors in the late 1990s. Peters battled Alzheimer's disease in his later years.

10 Sir Geoff Hurst | 1941 - present

Still the only man to score a hat-trick in a World Cup final, Hurst made more than 400 appearances for West Ham and won 49 England caps. Short-lived managerial stints with Telford United, Chelsea and even a foray into club management in Kuwait punctuated work in the insurance trade after his playing career. He was knighted in 1998 and lives in Cheltenham.

21 Roger Hunt | 1938 - present

Liverpool stalwart Hunt made more than 400 appearances for the Anfield club, along with winning 34 caps for England. Held Liverpool's all-time scoring record until overhauled by Ian Rush, although he remains the leading league scorer. Joined his family's haulage business after retiring from football and now lives in Warrington.

Sir Alf Ramsey (Head Coach) | 1920 - 1999

The former Southampton and Tottenham full-back continued at the England helm until 1974, when failure to qualify for the finals in West Germany cost him his job. Stints at Birmingham and Panathinaikos (plus a caretaker stint at Melchester after Roy of the Rovers was shot in the best-selling comic) followed, before he spent his retirement in Ipswich. Ramsey died in April 1999 aged 79, less than a year after suffering a stroke, and after battling Alzheimer's disease and prostate cancer.

Les Cocker (trainer) | 1924 - 1979

Cocker represented Stockport County and Accrington Stanley as a striker during a 12-year playing career. After his retirement in 1958 he turned his hand to coaching with both Luton Town and Leeds United before being offered a role with England. He was Team Trainer in 1966 but was not awarded a medal - like the majority of the non-playing staff and reserves - until June 2009, posthumously.

Of the Squad;

8. Greaves, James P.

11. Connelly, John M.

12. Springett, Ronald D.

13. Bonetti, Peter P.

14. Armfield, James C.

15. Byrne, Gerald

17. Flowers, Ronald

18. Hunter, Norman

19. Paine, Terence L.

20. Callaghan, Ian R.

22. Eastham, George E.

RIP Jack. A legend of the game.
 

mhead bee

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Those in BOLD still with us. Those in ITALICS sadly passed.

Just ten of the twenty-two alive, with just five of the XI loving life!

https://www.standard.co.uk/sport/fo...ld-cup-winners-now-west-germany-a4495456.html

1 Gordon Banks | 1937 - 2019

Went on to win 73 England caps and make 628 club appearances in a 15-year career. Still famed for his stunning save from Pele's header in England's 1970 World Cup clash with Brazil. Helped Stoke to the 1972 League Cup though lost the sight in one eye in a car crash in October later that same year, that ultimately ended his professional career. Enjoyed a brief managerial stint with Telford United.

2 George Cohen | 1939 - present

Fulham defender Cohen was forced to retire through injury aged 29, having amassed 459 appearances for the Craven Cottage club. Cohen struggled with bowel cancer for 14 years in the 1980s. He later opted to sell his World Cup winner's medal, though Fulham purchased the item to display it at Craven Cottage. Nephew Ben Cohen helped England win the Rugby World Cup in 2003. Awarded the MBE in 2000.

3 Ray Wilson | 1934 - 2018

England's left-back kept the lowest profile of the 1966 winners. Wilson built a successful undertaker's business in Huddersfield after his football career, but retired from his second career in 1997.

4 Nobby Stiles | 1942 - present

Midfielder Stiles ended up with 28 England caps but went on to rack up 392 appearances for Manchester United before a move to Middlesbrough in 1971. A career in coaching followed, with two stints at Preston, before a short-lived tenure at West Brom. Stiles worked as a youth team coach at Manchester United between 1989 and 1993, helping oversee the development of the renowned class of '92 that included the likes of David Beckham and the Neville brothers. His family have revealed he has been suffering from dementia for several years.

5 Jack Charlton | 1935 - 2020

Made 629 appearances for Leeds and collected 35 England caps, before turning attention to a successful managerial career. After stints with Middlesbrough, Sheffield Wednesday and Newcastle, Charlton stepped up to lead the Republic of Ireland. Against the odds, he led them to the Euros in 1988, the last eight of Italia 90 and then last 16 of the 1994 World. Appointed an OBE in 1974 and awarded honorary Irish citizenship in 1996, being made a freeman of the city of Dublin in 1994. He died in July 2020 after battling lymphoma and later dementia.

6 Bobby Moore | 1941 - 1993

Widely accepted as England's greatest centre-half and one of the best anywhere of all time, the World Cup-winning captain died from bowel and liver cancer in February 1993, aged 51. Won 108 caps for England, representing West Ham with distinction, before enjoying spells at Fulham and in America. Moore's widow Stephanie founded the Bobby Moore Fund in 1993, to raise money for research into bowel cancer and raise public awareness of the disease. His statue stands outside the new Wembley to commemorate England's greatest ever day.

7 Alan Ball | 1945 - 2007

Ball - the youngest of the World Cup winners - died of a heart attack in April 2007, aged 61. The combative midfielder excelled in stints with Blackpool, Everton and Arsenal, while also winning 72 England caps. After more than 800 club appearances Ball then moved into management, twice taking charge at Portsmouth along with stints at Southampton and Manchester City.

9 Sir Bobby Charlton | 1937 - present

Jack's younger brother Bobby continues to sit on Manchester United's board of directors, remaining a fixture at Old Trafford matches, and is a true global icon. The 81-year-old Ashington native racked up 106 England caps between 1958 and 1970 and was for decades England's leading goalscorer. He had an unsuccessful managerial stint at Preston before becoming a director at United in 1984. He was knighted in 1994.

16 Martin Peters | 1943 - 2019

Moved into the insurance business after retiring from professional football in 1981, following 67 England caps and lengthy stints with West Ham, Tottenham and Norwich. He was briefly manager of Sheffield United. Sat on Tottenham's board of directors in the late 1990s. Peters battled Alzheimer's disease in his later years.

10 Sir Geoff Hurst | 1941 - present

Still the only man to score a hat-trick in a World Cup final, Hurst made more than 400 appearances for West Ham and won 49 England caps. Short-lived managerial stints with Telford United, Chelsea and even a foray into club management in Kuwait punctuated work in the insurance trade after his playing career. He was knighted in 1998 and lives in Cheltenham.

21 Roger Hunt | 1938 - present

Liverpool stalwart Hunt made more than 400 appearances for the Anfield club, along with winning 34 caps for England. Held Liverpool's all-time scoring record until overhauled by Ian Rush, although he remains the leading league scorer. Joined his family's haulage business after retiring from football and now lives in Warrington.

Sir Alf Ramsey (Head Coach) | 1920 - 1999

The former Southampton and Tottenham full-back continued at the England helm until 1974, when failure to qualify for the finals in West Germany cost him his job. Stints at Birmingham and Panathinaikos (plus a caretaker stint at Melchester after Roy of the Rovers was shot in the best-selling comic) followed, before he spent his retirement in Ipswich. Ramsey died in April 1999 aged 79, less than a year after suffering a stroke, and after battling Alzheimer's disease and prostate cancer.

Les Cocker (trainer) | 1924 - 1979

Cocker represented Stockport County and Accrington Stanley as a striker during a 12-year playing career. After his retirement in 1958 he turned his hand to coaching with both Luton Town and Leeds United before being offered a role with England. He was Team Trainer in 1966 but was not awarded a medal - like the majority of the non-playing staff and reserves - until June 2009, posthumously.

Of the Squad;

8. Greaves, James P.

11. Connelly, John M.

12. Springett, Ronald D.

13. Bonetti, Peter P.

14. Armfield, James C.

15. Byrne, Gerald

17. Flowers, Ronald

18. Hunter, Norman

19. Paine, Terence L.

20. Callaghan, Ian R.

22. Eastham, George E.

RIP Jack. A legend of the game.


There were some really good players who never got a game, they would all feature today.
 

LboroBee

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I remember him most for managing Ireland (due to my age) - his success there was a lesson in maximising results with minimal resources.
Plus it seemed like he was having fun.

https://youtu.be/zdnZgmwA9h4

We’re not supposed to like the long ball any more, but some of the goalkeeper kicks at the start of that video are majestic 👍
 

kevalutonbee

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RIP

How do you think he would have lasted in games today?

773 appearances for one club. I bet no Leeds player will get anywhere that ever again
 

Lionel Bart-At

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I met the man when I was about 10. He and his wife were shopping in Leeds during the off-season. (Must have been a week day during the school holidays otherwise my old man would have been playing cricket.) Jack was nearing the end of his playing career and was very enthusiastic about his coaching badges. My dad was at a similar stage (non-leaguer himself). Both had met several times previously on courses and had really hit it off (Laurie McMenamy was another name I remember from conversations - way before anyone had ever heard of him). Anyway, I just remember me and my sister standing bored sh*tless at the top of this arcade as Jack and my dad stood chatting football, coaching and characters for what seemed like hours. My mum was compelled to chat with his missus about domestic stuff as was the requirement in the day. (She told me yesterday that she was ashamed to say that she found it difficult to focus on this conversation as Mrs C was cross-eyed and she was having difficulty knowing exactly how to achieve eye contact). ,

Ashamed that I could be bored (genuinely was) whilst standing a few feet from a childhood hero and World Cup winner. It was clear to see though, in retrospect, even from this tiny scenario, that Jack was such a genuine, honest, straightforward bloke with an uncomplicated and completely unaffected view of football and life. Not many Englishmen can show you a collection of medals which include a World Cup, FA Cup and First Division title. Add to that having led Ireland to a World Cup semi final appearance and Middlesbrough to a second tier title with a record points haul. What a giant of a man.
 

The Joker

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RIP Jack.

I have a vague memory of meeting him when I was only 11. He brought Newcastle to my home town of Dumfries for a pre-season friendly against Queen of the South. Must have been passing time in the afternoon pre-match when he was stood by the river in the town centre. My dad recognised him and encouraged (a shy) me to go over and ask for his autograph. He was as friendly and engaging as you'd imagine. Sadly, I long since lost that scrap of paper. :cry:
 

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