Using VAR in The Championship

West Wilts Bee

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This is so needed. Thomas Frank is right. The playoffs is a massive finale to the teams involved in it.If Stroud is put in place to officiate, then we need cameras everywhere.truth is that are not good enough even in the championship. Time to introduce the technology so much more reliable than STROUD can we please lose this inept person.
 

BFC1997

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Meh. I hate VAR. Causes more problems than it’s worth.

Pretty certain that any other officiating team that has been used in the Championship, League One or League Two this season would have made the right call today.

As infuriating as it was I don’t want the game to fundamentally change because of the odd farcical decision.
 

Vid

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Nothing wrong with VAR just the way it is implemented.
 

Les Beeavinu

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This is so needed. Thomas Frank is right. The playoffs is a massive finale to the teams involved in it.If Stroud is put in place to officiate, then we need cameras everywhere.truth is that are not good enough even in the championship. Time to introduce the technology so much more reliable than STROUD can we please lose this inept person.
Unfortunately, Griffin Park is one of the reasons I believe. I don't think we can host VAR cameras. Lionel Road can.
 

JCMcBee

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...stick VAR up your arse.
 

alexcavell

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Across a 40-game league season I don't think it's needed. It breaks up the play and spoils the moment of scoring a goal.

But in important, less frequent competitions where you absolutely want to ensure that the right team wins, like the World Cup or play-offs, I can see a place for it.
 

pompeybee

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This is so needed. Thomas Frank is right. The playoffs is a massive finale to the teams involved in it.If Stroud is put in place to officiate, then we need cameras everywhere.truth is that are not good enough even in the championship. Time to introduce the technology so much more reliable than STROUD can we please lose this inept person.
And if Stroud is the VAR referee?
 

kevalutonbee

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If they used VAR they would have had a second penalty.
They wouldnt.

Rico wouldn't have been sent off and from that point the whole game would have played out differently.
 

Lionel Bart-At

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Of course, you know what would happen if they were miraculously able to introduce it for the second leg...
 
OP
West Wilts Bee

West Wilts Bee

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True, but you know what I mean.
It can work both ways.
Hopefully we can turn it round.
I hope you know what I mean, if your happy to watch the inept performances of our so called officials in the championship then good luck. I am totally pissed off watching little Hitlers like Stroud get away with it. We have line persons that have a job to remember who the ball came off last. This was a massive game for us, which has probably cost us a place in the Premiership. Stroud is not up to the task the sooner he goes the better. Like a lot of you I go to football most weeks, this is no knee jerk reaction it’s a fact. The standard of refereeing in this country away from the premiership is shambolic i hope Stroud gives his match fee back.
 

Holysmit

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I would still prefer to have **** ups from Stroud and be able to enjoy the passion of scoring a goal. Rather then have a system which sucks the life out of the game.
 

johndub

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I would still prefer to have **** ups from Stroud and be able to enjoy the passion of scoring a goal. Rather then have a system which sucks the life out of the game.
I wouldn’t.
 

bee good

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See muff are considering taking legal action over the Hawkeye cock up in the villa Sheffield utd game. Cost them that not being given
 

ladbroke

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See muff are considering taking legal action over the Hawkeye cock up in the villa Sheffield utd game. Cost them that not being given
11 games where they lost by 1 could have been a factor in them being relegated. Draw any one of them may have helped... what about the 8 draws? Turn any one of them into a win.. and eureka..... they stay up...
 

Gee Bee

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See muff are considering taking legal action over the Hawkeye cock up in the villa Sheffield utd game. Cost them that not being given
So conceding too many goals and not scoring enough in loads of other matches didn’t cost them at all then?
 

Castleview

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It was supposed to be for "clear and obvious" errors. It's ruined games because they're wasting time checking everything.
 

grutter

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It was supposed to be for "clear and obvious" errors. It's ruined games because they're wasting time checking everything.
I agree, but that's only because managers whinge and whine at every little micro-decision that doesn't go their way. I've said all along, managers, pundits and fans have largely brought VAR in its current form on themselves. Take the offside rule. We now have goals disallowed because one inch of a player's boot is in an offside position in a freeze-frame and everyone moans about that. No-one would have moaned at that 10 years ago, even with a slo-mo replay. However, that is the right decision, as it is the only way you can say it's definitely offside or not. People like to say 'give it the benefit of the doubt'. The moment you say 'a foot either way' or 'benefit of the doubt', you will then get inconsistencies. And the one thing all players, managers and fans plead for in decision-making is consistency!
 

Oceanbee

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Perhaps someone can clarify this for me, as I’m not sure about this part of the offside rule.

In tonight’s match Barnsley V Chelsea, when Chelsea scored, the ball was played wide to a Chelsea player, but Abraham was already some 2 yards offside ahead of the last Barnsley defender.

He then runs towards the Barnsley goal and receives the next pass to tap in for a goal. However, he’s had at least 2 yards start from an offside position.
I would have thought that would have been called as offside as Abraham had a clear advantage.

Have I missed something in the complexities of the offside rule????
 

Leedsbee

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Perhaps someone can clarify this for me, as I’m not sure about this part of the offside rule.

In tonight’s match Barnsley V Chelsea, when Chelsea scored, the ball was played wide to a Chelsea player, but Abraham was already some 2 yards offside ahead of the last Barnsley defender.

He then runs towards the Barnsley goal and receives the next pass to tap in for a goal. However, he’s had at least 2 yards start from an offside position.
I would have thought that would have been called as offside as Abraham had a clear advantage.

Have I missed something in the complexities of the offside rule????
He's fine if the balls not to him.As long as he's onside when it's passed to him.You can be offside obscuring the keepers view but essentially that's it if you're not the active player.
 

Vid

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This is the latest offside rule. The main problem is the first sentence. I haven't read the rest of it.
Offside position

It is not an offence to be in an offside position.

A player is in an offside position if:
  • any part of the head, body or feet is in the opponents’ half (excluding the halfway line) and
  • any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent
  • The hands and arms of all players, including the goalkeepers, are not considered.
A player is not in an offside position if level with the:
  • second-last opponent or
  • last two opponents
Offside offence

A player in an offside position at the moment the ball is played or touched* by a team-mate is only penalised on becoming involved in active play by:
  • interfering with play by playing or touching a ball passed or touched by a team-mate or
  • interfering with an opponent by:
  • preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent’s line of vision or
  • challenging an opponent for the ball or
  • clearly attempting to play a ball which is close when this action impacts on an opponent or
  • making an obvious action which clearly impacts on the ability of an opponent to play the ball
*The first point of contact of the 'play' or 'touch' of the ball should be used

or
  • gaining an advantage by playing the ball or interfering with an opponent when it has:
  • rebounded or been deflected off the goalpost, crossbar or an opponent
  • been deliberately saved by any opponent
  • A player in an offside position receiving the ball from an opponent who deliberately plays the ball, including by deliberate handball, is not considered to have gained an advantage, unless it was a deliberate save by any opponent.
A ‘save’ is when a player stops, or attempts to stop, a ball which is going into or very close to the goal with any part of the body except the hands/arms (unless the goalkeeper within the penalty area).

In situations where:

  • a player moving from, or standing in, an offside position is in the way of an opponent and interferes with the movement of the opponent towards the ball this is an offside offence if it impacts on the ability of the opponent to play or challenge for the ball; if the player moves into the way of an opponent and impedes the opponent's progress (e.g blocks the opponent) the offence should be penalised under Law 12
  • a player in an offisde position is moving towards the ball with the intention of playing the ball and is fouled before playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the foul is penalised as it has occurred before the offside offence
  • an offence is committed against a player in an offside position who is already playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the offside offence is penalised as it has occurred before the foul challenge
No offence

There is no offside offence if a player receives the ball directly from:
  • a goal kick
  • a throw-in
  • a corner kick
Offences and sanctions

If an offside offence occurs, the referee awards an indirect free kick where the offence occurred, including if it is in the player’s own half of the field of play.

A defending player who leaves the field of play without the referee’s permission shall be considered to be on the goal line or touchline for the purposes of offside until the next stoppage in play or until the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside its penalty area. If the player left the field of play deliberately, the player must be cautioned when the ball is next out of play.

An attacking player may step or stay off the field of play not to be involved in active play. If the player re-enters from the goal line and becomes involved in play before the next stoppage in play, or the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside its penalty area, the player shall be considered to be positioned on the goal line for the purposes of offside. A player who deliberately leaves the field of play and re-enters without the referee’s permission and is not penalised for offside and gains an advantage, must be cautioned.

If an attacking player remains stationary between the goalposts and inside the goal as the ball enters the goal, a goal must be awarded unless the player commits an offside offence or Law 12 offence in which case play is restarted with an indirect or direct free kick.
 

Banana

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This is the latest offside rule. The main problem is the first sentence. I haven't read the rest of it.
Offside position

It is not an offence to be in an offside position.

A player is in an offside position if:
  • any part of the head, body or feet is in the opponents’ half (excluding the halfway line) and
  • any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent
  • The hands and arms of all players, including the goalkeepers, are not considered.
A player is not in an offside position if level with the:
  • second-last opponent or
  • last two opponents
Offside offence

A player in an offside position at the moment the ball is played or touched* by a team-mate is only penalised on becoming involved in active play by:
  • interfering with play by playing or touching a ball passed or touched by a team-mate or
  • interfering with an opponent by:
  • preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent’s line of vision or
  • challenging an opponent for the ball or
  • clearly attempting to play a ball which is close when this action impacts on an opponent or
  • making an obvious action which clearly impacts on the ability of an opponent to play the ball
*The first point of contact of the 'play' or 'touch' of the ball should be used

or
  • gaining an advantage by playing the ball or interfering with an opponent when it has:
  • rebounded or been deflected off the goalpost, crossbar or an opponent
  • been deliberately saved by any opponent
  • A player in an offside position receiving the ball from an opponent who deliberately plays the ball, including by deliberate handball, is not considered to have gained an advantage, unless it was a deliberate save by any opponent.
A ‘save’ is when a player stops, or attempts to stop, a ball which is going into or very close to the goal with any part of the body except the hands/arms (unless the goalkeeper within the penalty area).

In situations where:

  • a player moving from, or standing in, an offside position is in the way of an opponent and interferes with the movement of the opponent towards the ball this is an offside offence if it impacts on the ability of the opponent to play or challenge for the ball; if the player moves into the way of an opponent and impedes the opponent's progress (e.g blocks the opponent) the offence should be penalised under Law 12
  • a player in an offisde position is moving towards the ball with the intention of playing the ball and is fouled before playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the foul is penalised as it has occurred before the offside offence
  • an offence is committed against a player in an offside position who is already playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the offside offence is penalised as it has occurred before the foul challenge
No offence

There is no offside offence if a player receives the ball directly from:
  • a goal kick
  • a throw-in
  • a corner kick
Offences and sanctions

If an offside offence occurs, the referee awards an indirect free kick where the offence occurred, including if it is in the player’s own half of the field of play.

A defending player who leaves the field of play without the referee’s permission shall be considered to be on the goal line or touchline for the purposes of offside until the next stoppage in play or until the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside its penalty area. If the player left the field of play deliberately, the player must be cautioned when the ball is next out of play.

An attacking player may step or stay off the field of play not to be involved in active play. If the player re-enters from the goal line and becomes involved in play before the next stoppage in play, or the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside its penalty area, the player shall be considered to be positioned on the goal line for the purposes of offside. A player who deliberately leaves the field of play and re-enters without the referee’s permission and is not penalised for offside and gains an advantage, must be cautioned.

If an attacking player remains stationary between the goalposts and inside the goal as the ball enters the goal, a goal must be awarded unless the player commits an offside offence or Law 12 offence in which case play is restarted with an indirect or direct free kick.
Well that clearly articulated how the offside law was applied to this situation. Thanks for your contribution.
 

Paul O'Brien

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This is the latest offside rule. The main problem is the first sentence. I haven't read the rest of it.
Offside position

It is not an offence to be in an offside position.

A player is in an offside position if:
  • any part of the head, body or feet is in the opponents’ half (excluding the halfway line) and
  • any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent
  • The hands and arms of all players, including the goalkeepers, are not considered.
A player is not in an offside position if level with the:
  • second-last opponent or
  • last two opponents
Offside offence

A player in an offside position at the moment the ball is played or touched* by a team-mate is only penalised on becoming involved in active play by:
  • interfering with play by playing or touching a ball passed or touched by a team-mate or
  • interfering with an opponent by:
  • preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent’s line of vision or
  • challenging an opponent for the ball or
  • clearly attempting to play a ball which is close when this action impacts on an opponent or
  • making an obvious action which clearly impacts on the ability of an opponent to play the ball
*The first point of contact of the 'play' or 'touch' of the ball should be used

or
  • gaining an advantage by playing the ball or interfering with an opponent when it has:
  • rebounded or been deflected off the goalpost, crossbar or an opponent
  • been deliberately saved by any opponent
  • A player in an offside position receiving the ball from an opponent who deliberately plays the ball, including by deliberate handball, is not considered to have gained an advantage, unless it was a deliberate save by any opponent.
A ‘save’ is when a player stops, or attempts to stop, a ball which is going into or very close to the goal with any part of the body except the hands/arms (unless the goalkeeper within the penalty area).

In situations where:

  • a player moving from, or standing in, an offside position is in the way of an opponent and interferes with the movement of the opponent towards the ball this is an offside offence if it impacts on the ability of the opponent to play or challenge for the ball; if the player moves into the way of an opponent and impedes the opponent's progress (e.g blocks the opponent) the offence should be penalised under Law 12
  • a player in an offisde position is moving towards the ball with the intention of playing the ball and is fouled before playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the foul is penalised as it has occurred before the offside offence
  • an offence is committed against a player in an offside position who is already playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the offside offence is penalised as it has occurred before the foul challenge
No offence

There is no offside offence if a player receives the ball directly from:
  • a goal kick
  • a throw-in
  • a corner kick
Offences and sanctions

If an offside offence occurs, the referee awards an indirect free kick where the offence occurred, including if it is in the player’s own half of the field of play.

A defending player who leaves the field of play without the referee’s permission shall be considered to be on the goal line or touchline for the purposes of offside until the next stoppage in play or until the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside its penalty area. If the player left the field of play deliberately, the player must be cautioned when the ball is next out of play.

An attacking player may step or stay off the field of play not to be involved in active play. If the player re-enters from the goal line and becomes involved in play before the next stoppage in play, or the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside its penalty area, the player shall be considered to be positioned on the goal line for the purposes of offside. A player who deliberately leaves the field of play and re-enters without the referee’s permission and is not penalised for offside and gains an advantage, must be cautioned.

If an attacking player remains stationary between the goalposts and inside the goal as the ball enters the goal, a goal must be awarded unless the player commits an offside offence or Law 12 offence in which case play is restarted with an indirect or direct free kick.
The only reference I can see to a player needing to be behind the ball when it is played is
"any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent". But there's no reference to a ball played backwards.
This seems to suggest that a ball played back to a player who is already past the defender/goalie still puts him offside. That's clearly not normal practice.

Can anyone clarify?
 

Oceanbee

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Thanks for all the offside law contributions. It now makes the whole situation as completely clear as being in a London pea-souper fog, back in the day!

From what Leedsbee above has posted at #27, let alone the complete simple rules from Vid, then why don’t teams just always leave a player waiting around a few yards beyond the last defender?
So long as he doesn’t receive a direct pass past the last defender, then he’s got a head start, and is ready to receive a cross from another attacker sprinting down the wing, who’s beaten the defenders out there.
So long as the cross is played an inch back to him, he’s not offside.

If you did what Abraham did in last night’s match, it’s clear because of the speed of the attack that he was way ahead of the last defender, and ready to receive the cross.
Seems like a perfect tactic, if that is really not offside!
 

BlueJayBee

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This is the latest offside rule. The main problem is the first sentence. I haven't read the rest of it.
Offside position

It is not an offence to be in an offside position.

A player is in an offside position if:
  • any part of the head, body or feet is in the opponents’ half (excluding the halfway line) and
  • any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent
  • The hands and arms of all players, including the goalkeepers, are not considered.
A player is not in an offside position if level with the:
  • second-last opponent or
  • last two opponents
Offside offence

A player in an offside position at the moment the ball is played or touched* by a team-mate is only penalised on becoming involved in active play by:
  • interfering with play by playing or touching a ball passed or touched by a team-mate or
  • interfering with an opponent by:
  • preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent’s line of vision or
  • challenging an opponent for the ball or
  • clearly attempting to play a ball which is close when this action impacts on an opponent or
  • making an obvious action which clearly impacts on the ability of an opponent to play the ball
*The first point of contact of the 'play' or 'touch' of the ball should be used

or
  • gaining an advantage by playing the ball or interfering with an opponent when it has:
  • rebounded or been deflected off the goalpost, crossbar or an opponent
  • been deliberately saved by any opponent
  • A player in an offside position receiving the ball from an opponent who deliberately plays the ball, including by deliberate handball, is not considered to have gained an advantage, unless it was a deliberate save by any opponent.
A ‘save’ is when a player stops, or attempts to stop, a ball which is going into or very close to the goal with any part of the body except the hands/arms (unless the goalkeeper within the penalty area).

In situations where:

  • a player moving from, or standing in, an offside position is in the way of an opponent and interferes with the movement of the opponent towards the ball this is an offside offence if it impacts on the ability of the opponent to play or challenge for the ball; if the player moves into the way of an opponent and impedes the opponent's progress (e.g blocks the opponent) the offence should be penalised under Law 12
  • a player in an offisde position is moving towards the ball with the intention of playing the ball and is fouled before playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the foul is penalised as it has occurred before the offside offence
  • an offence is committed against a player in an offside position who is already playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the offside offence is penalised as it has occurred before the foul challenge
No offence

There is no offside offence if a player receives the ball directly from:
  • a goal kick
  • a throw-in
  • a corner kick
Offences and sanctions

If an offside offence occurs, the referee awards an indirect free kick where the offence occurred, including if it is in the player’s own half of the field of play.

A defending player who leaves the field of play without the referee’s permission shall be considered to be on the goal line or touchline for the purposes of offside until the next stoppage in play or until the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside its penalty area. If the player left the field of play deliberately, the player must be cautioned when the ball is next out of play.

An attacking player may step or stay off the field of play not to be involved in active play. If the player re-enters from the goal line and becomes involved in play before the next stoppage in play, or the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside its penalty area, the player shall be considered to be positioned on the goal line for the purposes of offside. A player who deliberately leaves the field of play and re-enters without the referee’s permission and is not penalised for offside and gains an advantage, must be cautioned.

If an attacking player remains stationary between the goalposts and inside the goal as the ball enters the goal, a goal must be awarded unless the player commits an offside offence or Law 12 offence in which case play is restarted with an indirect or direct free kick.
I started reading it, but gave up because I could feel myself losing the will to live.
 

Themepark

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The only reference I can see to a player needing to be behind the ball when it is played is
"any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent". But there's no reference to a ball played backwards.
This seems to suggest that a ball played back to a player who is already past the defender/goalie still puts him offside. That's clearly not normal practice.

Can anyone clarify?
"any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent"

Needs both boxes ticked to be offside. So if you're nearer to the goal line than the second to last defender is, but the ball is nearer to it than you are when it's played, you're onside :sorted:
 

Paul O'Brien

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"any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent"

Needs both boxes ticked to be offside. So if you're nearer to the goal line than the second to last defender is, but the ball is nearer to it than you are when it's played, you're onside :sorted:
Dohhh! Thanks.
 

The Pipe

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No wonder nobody knows if players are off side or not as the rules seem to have been prepared by a dyslexic monkey😂😂
 

Alan D

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Keep VAR away from the championship, the one thing I’m actually really not looking forward to when we get promoted is VAR, it’s horrendous in its current form.
Personally I think the concept of VAR is good, as it was intoduced to correct clear and obvious referee mistakes. However, in England they have gone OTT with some muppet sitting mikes away with ruler drawing lines and taking a lifetime to come to conclusions. By and large they don't seem to have the same problem in other countries.
 

Vid

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OK I've gone back to post #28 to satisfy my masochistic tendencies.

"If an offside offence occurs, the referee awards an indirect free kick where the offence occurred, including if it is in the player’s own half of the field of play."

How can you be offside in your own half ?
 

ladbroke

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OK I've gone back to post #28 to satisfy my masochistic tendencies.

"If an offside offence occurs, the referee awards an indirect free kick where the offence occurred, including if it is in the player’s own half of the field of play."

How can you be offside in your own half ?
He is not offside in his own half. When the ball is played and the offender, who is offside (in opponents half), receives the ball inside his own half by coming back to get/challenge the ball then the offside is from where he played/challenged for it. Thus the offside is in his own half.
It is always about where the player was as the ball was played the him/her as to whether they are offside, but its where they collect/challenge for the ball as to where the offside is given.
This means you can take the free kick inside opponents half.
I believe this was done to give advantage to team with the kick as players would be offside and then force the ball back 10 yards at times.
 

Vid

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He is not offside in his own half. When the ball is played and the offender, who is offside (in opponents half), receives the ball inside his own half by coming back to get/challenge the ball then the offside is from where he played/challenged for it. Thus the offside is in his own half.
It is always about where the player was as the ball was played the him/her as to whether they are offside, but its where they collect/challenge for the ball as to where the offside is given.
This means you can take the free kick inside opponents half.
I believe this was done to give advantage to team with the kick as players would be offside and then force the ball back 10 yards at times.
"He is not offside in his own half"..."Thus the offside is in his own half." I'm going for another lie down. I'll get back to you.
 

looneytunes

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"any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent"

Needs both boxes ticked to be offside. So if you're nearer to the goal line than the second to last defender is, but the ball is nearer to it than you are when it's played, you're onside :sorted:
Didn't always used to be if there was any doubt you were onside.
To make this the equivalent it should be if any of your feet are onside then that should be classed as onside or has it changed since I more or less gave up watching the pro game.
 

Themepark

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Didn't always used to be if there was any doubt you were onside.
To make this the equivalent it should be if any of your feet are onside then that should be classed as onside or has it changed since I more or less gave up watching the pro game.
It's now "any part of scoring body" can be offside
 

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Interesting incident in the Man City game on Sky at the moment.

Foden received the ball in a very advanced position, but the Spurs player just managed to tackle him, at the expense of a corner. However, Foden was offside, so if he had managed to score from the attack, or make an Assist, the "goal" would have been ruled out by VAR.

However, had City scored from the corner, it would have stood.
 

Banana

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Interesting incident in the Man City game on Sky at the moment.

Foden received the ball in a very advanced position, but the Spurs player just managed to tackle him, at the expense of a corner. However, Foden was offside, so if he had managed to score from the attack, or make an Assist, the "goal" would have been ruled out by VAR.

However, had City scored from the corner, it would have stood.
Not interesting at all. It's obvious that it's clearly a different phase. You couldn't find a more obvious example.
 

Ealing Bee

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Not interesting at all. It's obvious that it's clearly a different phase. You couldn't find a more obvious example.
"Different phase"?

Foden's touch led straight to a goalscoring opportunity (corner), just the same as if he'd passed to a teammate.

You couldn't find a more obvious example of VAR being used for some offsides, but not for others.
 

TeeJayBee

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"any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent"

Needs both boxes ticked to be offside. So if you're nearer to the goal line than the second to last defender is, but the ball is nearer to it than you are when it's played, you're onside :sorted:
I think that’s one aspect of offside that has been the same for years(?)
 

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