When were pitchside Dugouts introduced to Football?

Ealing Bee

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Or did professional stadia always have them?

I expect not, since there were no substitutes allowed until the mid-60's, nor Managers didn't have a team of coaches and assistants, either, so no call for them.

I assume that back in the day home managers used to watch games from high up in the Main Stand, often in the Directors Box (best view), but where did the visiting manager sit?

And I do know that even after dugouts were installed, a lot of managers would still start off watching the game from the Stand, then move down to the dugout midway through the second half. Iirc, George Graham was one of the last to maintain this habit. And I seem to remember David W£bb sitting in the Braemar, or is that just my imagination?

Any old timers or historians able to enlighten me?
 

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They were first suggested by Steve MClaren. He said it would save him having to carry a brolly.
 

Milton Keynes Bee

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Or did professional stadia always have them?

I expect not, since there were no substitutes allowed until the mid-60's, nor Managers didn't have a team of coaches and assistants, either, so no call for them.

I assume that back in the day home managers used to watch games from high up in the Main Stand, often in the Directors Box (best view), but where did the visiting manager sit?

And I do know that even after dugouts were installed, a lot of managers would still start off watching the game from the Stand, then move down to the dugout midway through the second half. Iirc, George Graham was one of the last to maintain this habit. And I seem to remember David W£bb sitting in the Braemar, or is that just my imagination?

Any old timers or historians able to enlighten me?
There were dug outs since at least the early 1960s. Very small. Just about squeeze the manager, sponge man and a single sub in. Think subs started in the 65/66 season. Was Ron Crisp the first nominated BFC sub? Can't remember the first to actually be used.
 
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Ealing Bee

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Excellent Spot!

Though assuming that was an actual stadium shot, and not a studio get-up, it looks to be just a section of the grandstand i.e. not a stand-alone structure in its own right?

Incidentally - though it's doubtless been mentioned somewhere before:
"The film stars several Arsenal players and members of staff such as Cliff Bastin and Eddie Hapgood, although only manager George Allison has a speaking part. The [opposition] Trojans' body doubles on the pitch were players from Brentford, filmed during the First Division fixture between the two sides on 6 May 1939; this was the last match of the 1938–39 season and Arsenal's last official league fixture before the outbreak of the Second World War. Brentford’s players wore white shirts for the match because their first choice red and white stripes would have clashed with Arsenal's red and white jerseys. The Trojans’ players therefore wore similar white shirts in close up sequences which were then cut in with the match action."
50. The Arsenal Stadium Mystery
 

gbems92

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The first football stadium to feature a dugout was Pittodrie Stadium, home of Aberdeen, where dugouts were introduced by trainer Donald Colman in the 1920s. He wanted a place to take notes and observe his players (especially their feet, hence the reason for being set partially below pitch level) without sacrificing the shelter provided by a grandstand.[2]

The defined space of the technical area was established in the notes section of the Laws of the Game by FIFA in 1993.[1]
 
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Ealing Bee

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The first football stadium to feature a dugout was Pittodrie Stadium, home of Aberdeen, where dugouts were introduced by trainer Donald Colman in the 1920s. He wanted a place to take notes and observe his players (especially their feet, hence the reason for being set partially below pitch level) without sacrificing the shelter provided by a grandstand.[2]

The defined space of the technical area was established in the notes section of the Laws of the Game by FIFA in 1993.[1]
 

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